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We received an awesome email from Professor James Carter in El Paso this week, about his inventive use of the Little Lit series in his English 3349 class. He writes:

“For the second year in a row, I’ve asked students in my Dramatic Modes of English Language Arts teacher-education class to consider how they might use comics stories as thematic bridges into more traditional texts. Big Fat Little Lit is one of the key texts they use for their comics stories. This year’s crop of ideas is pretty impressive!”

We agree! See what they’re up to.

And for more on Little Lit, including online stories and games, click here.

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by admin

Yesterday I was lucky enough to sit on a panel moderated by Brian Heater, with Matt Loux, Raina Telgemeier, Dave Roman, Sara Varon, about “the past, present, and future” of comics for kids! Three real live kids attended, and I’m not sure how into our discourse they were, but I gave them a couple TOON Books, and we saw “kids love comics” in action.

Raina Telgemeier, artist behind the graphic novel Babysitters Club series, talked about target age ranges, and how adding a graphic component makes it possible for a younger reader to access the same book that’s targeted for someone older.

Dave Roman made a lot of interesting remarks about gender and content: girls have no problems reading books with a boy protagonist, but boys are less likely to read something with a heroine.

We talked about librarians, what important gatekeepers they are to getting comics into libraries and classrooms.

Last Tuesday, while sitting at the TOON table at the NYC School Librarian Conference, one enthusiastic librarian picked up one of our books, looked at me with surprise, and said, “It’s like a real book!”

Amen to that.

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by admin

Have you checked out TOON in the Classroom lately? Not only can teachers find lesson plans and activity sheets, but you can also watch kids act out Luke on the Loose, and listen to your favorite TOON Books read aloud by the authors in the TOON Reader! Hear Otto’s Orange Day read by artist Frank Cammuso, and Little Mouse Gets Ready, read by Jeff Smith!

We loved finding the blog of Mrs. Clarken’s class. To teach a lesson on reading a comic strip, she assigned Otto’s Orange Day, and asked the students to comment on what makes a comic different from a picture book. One child wrote in:

“Mrs. Clarken, I think that when he got the lamp he got so, so, so, so, so, pleased but I think he will soon discover that he should not have done that.”

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves.

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